Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Open Door of Hattie's Hat


Open Door of Hattie's Hat
Photo & Text Copyright 2009 Seattle Daily Photo. All rights reserved, including reproduction or republishing.
This is the hand painted logo on the front door of the popular 100+ year old dive bar and restaurant in the heart of Old Ballard, Hattie's Hat. I've always loved the tile work that adorns the exterior, and here it is seen through the propped open door's glass. This is one of the few places in Seattle to serve Poutine, that comfort food delicacy commonly enjoyed by friends north of the border (pronounced poo-tin). But the establishment is most known as a popular neighborhood watering hole and a place to grab a tasty meal before or after shows at close-by music venues on Ballard Ave. They also draw crowds for their weekend all day brunches.

14 comments:

Steffe said...

I wonder if you can get poutine in Stockholm?

brattcat said...

Wonderful reflections in this, Kim.

Marcie said...

Fun image!! I love the reflections.

lewi14 said...

It must be a lovely place because of this lovely sign. I wonder that Poutine is served in Seattle too, never seen during my visit. I only know it from Quebec, it was delicious.

Meri said...

Okay, time for a field trip to Ballard. Ja sure, ya betcha!

Louis la Vache said...

«Louis» had never heard of poutine until yesterday - and here you have a post about it!

Louis la Vache said...

Yes, we must pay attention both to the spelling and pronunciation of this word! It's a bit too much like putain!

Laurie said...

Poutine! Wow, I'd forgotten about that.

I think I would love Hattie's Hat, too. I love your shot of it!

Mary said...

Nice picture and story, Kim. When my son & I visited my other son in Seattle we went to a restaurant we had seen on Food Network and my younger son ate a 12 egg omelette, YIKES!

Wayne said...

As far as I'm concerned the fewer places that serve poutine the better :-)

Around here, unless you're a Quebecois, it tends to come out as pou-teen

cieldequimper said...

Bright and cheerful but I'll skip the poutine...

Jilly said...

Fascinating Kim and interesting to see mention of Poutine. I posted on it yesterday - on Menton - and the photo, as you'll see is quite different.

Love the logo and the photograph.

Kim said...

@ Steffe- I wouldn't doubt it :-).

@ Brattcat & Marcie, thank you. I guess the reflection makes the image have 3 layers of view. :-)

@ Louis, Oh my! I had no idea. We must tread carefully with language, especially when we haven't the foggiest.

@Laurie, I had forgotten, too, until I browsed the menu and saw it and remembered my Canadian friends going on and on trying to explain to me what it was and why it was so great a fave with them.

@ Mary, Wow, what was that place? Did he eat the whole thing?

@ Wayne, hmmm. . . I wonder if that pronunciation is food commentary or just poor accent? ;^)

@ Cieldequimper, Thank you, and bon appetit!

@ Jilly, how weird is THAT!? Very fun that we would both mention this, ah, delicacy, at all, let alone on the same day. Now you have me wondering if the Quebecois who introduced it to Canada got it from some great great great great grandmama's home recipe in the south of France, minus the seafood aspect. Non, it could not be. It is gelatinous bar food, it is inconceivable that it would have originated where fries are pommes frites and gravy is sauce and cheese does not generally take the form cheddar curds! :-) I mean--they serve this at McDonalds in Quebec!!! 8-p Seriously, I wonder what the origins outside Quebec might be? I love that we were in sync!
-Kim

Bibi said...

Hi, Kim. Was about to comment on the coincidence with Jilly's poutine, but see that Jilly beat me to it! And yes, it is POO-teen. All I can say is that it is very French Canadian, and the French French I know wouldn't touch it with a 10-foot (meter?) pole.

I must visit Hattie's Hat anyway.