Thursday, June 19, 2008

More Creative Ironwork

Creative Ironwork

Photo & Text Copyright 2008 Seattle Daily Photo. All rights reserved, including reproduction or republishing.

The ironwork fence railing at the top of an exterior staircase in the Pioneer Square area reminds me of grasses bent in the breeze. I thought it was a nice topper for this structure at the back side of the 1999 King Street Center office building. It is located across from the entrance to King Street Station (for another view, see my More Seattle Stuff page). I liked the yellow paint with the gray textured wall (and blue sky! There are some incredible ironwork artists and craftspeople in Seattle. I noticed the Cafe Fiore on 32ndNW / NW85th is installing new custom wrought ironwork around their front entrance and hope to photograph that soon.

If you've got a couple minutes, check out the ANIMOTO video in the sidebar (with soundtrack, so crank up your speakers). It features some photos from two years of archives. Let me know what you think. ~K.

6 comments:

Abraham Lincoln said...

I remember the greatest iron worker I ever saw was Tommy Rice. He could take a piece of iron and beat it into anything including new shoes for oxen that pulled the heavy wagons through the village where I was born.

Thanks for visiting and commenting.

SeattleDMBfan said...

Great photo, Kim! These remind me of the wheat in the fields blowing in the wind when I was a kid growing up in North Dakota.

Dan said...

Spectacular pic Kim. really love the colors and shadows on this. You have really used the texture in the wall nicely.

Hard to find craftmanship like this. Seems like most new construction is to one degree or another prefabricated and institutional.

Louis la Vache said...

The grass analogy is a good one for this very interesting image!

Steffe said...

Cool shot. I'm waiting for that video to load now...

Hyde DP said...

What I like about this ironwork is that it doesn't have sharp points on it - most have (perhaps deliberately, perhaps not) and are obviously very dangerous should someone fall on them - not looked at larger context but these seem designed more to prevent folk falling of the edge than gaining entry.