Friday, August 08, 2008

Point Through the Arch

Point Through the Arch

Photo & Text Copyright 2008 Seattle Daily Photo. All rights reserved, including reproduction or republishing.

It's 08-08-08 and this is the view through the railroad bridge arch from Commodore Park in the Magnolia neighborhood on a fine summer day in Seattle. The point of land visible is at the mouth of Salmon Bay inlet where boats can enter the ship canal from Puget Sound and venture through the nearby locks and on to Lakes Union and Washington. I've shown you this amazing draw bridge in the down position at sunset with a train rumbling along. To see it up, visit my More Seattle Stuff page.

Update 8-12: Thanks to Seattle Guide Greg for adding this information in the comments:
Built by the Great Northern and known to BNSF and rail buffs as Bridge Number 4. Cost was more than 1 million dollars to build. The 500 ton concrete counterweight is used to lift the 200 foot Bascule span. The counterweight has space inside so old rails used as additional weight in the winter to counter the absorption of rain by the ties. In the summer months the weights are removed.
Other than a major upgrade in 1992 that replace the old hand levers and footpedals, wiring and gears and signals(that cost more than the bridge itself did) it remains largely unchanged.
At more than 95 years old, it still averages more than 30 trains a day, or more than 250 lifts a month
.

5 comments:

Linda Reeder said...

Love this shot!

Virginia said...

What a great perspective. It is framed so nicely.
Glad you are back!

静水盈盈 said...

Glad to "see" you again!

Seattle Guide Greg said...

Built by the Great Northern and known to BSNF and rail buffs as Bridge Number 4. Cost was more than 1 million dollars to build. The 500 ton concrete counterweight is used to lift the 200 foot Bascule span. The counterweight has space inside so old rails used as additional weight in the winter to counter the absorption of rain by the ties. In the summer months the weights are removed.

Other than a major upgrade in 1992 that replace the old hand levers and footpedals, wiring and gears and signals(that cost more than the bridge itself did) it remains largely unchanged.

At more than 95 years old, it still averages more than 30 trains a day, or more than 250 lifts a month.

Blacksun said...

I like the bridge.. like a frame for the background.